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The Ethical Limits of Markets

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The Georgetown Institute for the Study of Markets and Ethics (GISME) at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business will focus its fall symposium on “The Ethical Limits of Markets” on Friday, Nov. 21.

The symposium will explore questions surrounding ethical limitations on markets, including: Are there any goods or services that should not be bought or sold? Are there any market activities that should be prohibited because they undermine human dignity? Are there certain types of transactions that are by their nature immoral?

The program brings together 13 notable philosophers, political scientists, and legal theorists representing a spectrum of ideological and intellectual perspectives to discuss these questions.

WHEN:      
Friday, November 21, 2014
8:15 a.m. to 5 p.m.

WHERE:      
Georgetown University McDonough School of Business
Lohrfink Auditorium, 37th & O Streets, NW
Washington, D.C.

RSVP:  
To RSVP, visit http://bit.ly/GUethics

Media who are interested in covering the event should contact Brynn Boyer, assistant director of communications, at (202) 687-5254 or Brynn.Boyer@georgetown.edu

PROGRAM:

8:15 - 8:30 a.m. | Welcome 

John Hasnas, executive director, Georgetown Institute for the Study of Markets and Ethics 

8:30 - 10:00 a.m. | Panel I – Are There Any Ethical Limits on Markets?

Moderator: John Hasnas, Georgetown University McDonough School of Business

Essayists: 
Jason Brennan/Peter Jaworski, Georgetown University McDonough School of Business: Commodification: It’s the How, Not the What
Mark Pennington, King’s College, London: Why Most Things Should Probably Be for Sale
Matt Zwolinski, University of San Diego: A Libertarian Case for the Moral Limits of Markets 

10:15 - 11:45 a.m. | Panel II – Are We Asking the Wrong Question?
 
Moderator: Jason Brennan, Georgetown University McDonough School of Business

Essayists: 
Richard Greenstein, Temple University Law School: What is the Problem?
Loren Lomasky, University of Virginia: Markets and Morality
Kendy Hess, Holy Cross: Metaphors Matter

12:00 - 1:15 p.m. | Lunch 

1:30 - 3:00 p.m. | Panel III – Specific Applications
 
Moderator: Eric Campbell, Georgetown University McDonough School of Business

Essayists: 
Christopher Freiman, The College of William and Mary: Commodifying Nature 
Kimberly Krawiec, Duke University School of Law: Lessons from Law About Incomplete Commodification in the Egg Market
Michael Kates, Georgetown University McDonough School of Business: Markets, Sweatshops, and Coercion

3:15 - 4:45 p.m. | Panel IV- Intriguing Tangents
 
Moderator: Peter Jaworski, Georgetown University McDonough School of Business

Essayists:  
Ellen Kennedy
, University of Pennsylvania: A Good Economy
Steven Wall, University of Arizona: Capitalism, Leisure, and the Good Life
Amy Sepinwall, University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business: Constitutional Commodification

4:45 - 5:00 p.m. | Closing remarks 

John Hasnas, Georgetown University McDonough School of Business

About the Georgetown Institute for the Study of Markets and Ethics
The Georgetown Institute for the Study of Markets and Ethics brings together the finest scholars and best teachers from different fields to advance understanding of the ethical issues inherent in the functioning of the market society. The institute’s comprehensive approach to the study of markets and ethics extends beyond the exploration of ethical questions related to business people functioning in the organizational setting to include issues surrounding law and law enforcement policy and the pressures of conducting business in a political environment with rules that are subject to change. Learn more at http://gisme.georgetown.edu

About Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business
Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business provides a transformational education through classroom and experiential learning, preparing students to graduate as principled leaders in service to business and society. Through numerous centers, initiatives, and partnerships, Georgetown McDonough seeks to create a meaningful impact on business practice through both research and teaching. All academic programs provide a global perspective, woven through the undergraduate and graduate curriculum in a way that is unique to Washington, D.C. – the nexus of world business and policy – and to Georgetown University’s connections to global partner organizations and a world-wide alumni network. Founded in 1957, Georgetown McDonough is home to some 1,400 undergraduates, 1,000 MBA students, and 1,200 participants in executive degree and open enrollment programs. Learn more at http://msb.georgetown.edu. Follow us on Twitter @msbgu.